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  • Writer's pictureCulinary Cam

Huevos Rotos (Broken Eggs) + Juvé & Camps Reserva de la Familia Gran Reserva Brut #WinePW

Updated: Jul 9, 2023

This month Deanna of Wineivore posed this question to the Wine Pairing Weekend writers: "Does Cava really pair with everything? Grab a bottle, pair with anything, and join the discussion!"


Here's the line-up of the #WinePW writers' exploration of this fun, affordable Spanish sparkling wine. All of these will be live between Friday, July 7th and Saturday, July 8th. There will also be a truncated Twitter chat as there have been some recent restrictions placed on the number of tweets you can see, or something like that. I am not totally current on the social media dramas unfolding this week. In any case, check out these articles by my fellow Wine Pairing Weekend writers...



Diving into Cava


Back in 2021, I participated in #CavaWeek. I poured 2017 Alta Alella Mirgin Cava Reserva Brut Nature in one post - Spanish Bubbles and the Crispy vs. Chewy Cookie Debate. Then I paired Cava and Cabrales Salad + Cava Faustino Brut Reserva.


For this event, I wanted to dive a little bit deeper into Cava and how to pair it.


First, let’s go over some basics of creating Cava pairings though, admittedly, Cava is a ridiculously food friendly wine that can be paired with just about anything. Still you should consider the sweetness and style to create a truly amazing food pairing.


Things to consider...


Level of Acidity in the Food actually enhances the perception of sweetness and fruitiness in the wine and, interestingly, lowers the perception of acidity in the wine. I like to match the levels of acidity in the food to the acidity in the win. Also acidity can cut through the richness of a food.


Level of Salt in Food makes a wine feel fuller as well as reducing the perception of bitterness and acidity in wine. Level of Sweetness in Food actually lowers the perception of sweetness and fruitiness in the wine.

Level of Fat in Food. Higher, richer foods can be complemented by sweeter wines.


Then there's the style of the Cava...


Cava must be aged on the lees for a minimum of nine months. Those younger cava is usually more fresh and fruity with higher acid levels.


Reserva Cava must be aged on the lees for a minimum of fifteen months. The longer time on the lees are usually more earthy and have more weight on the palate.


Gran Reserva Cava has been aged on the lees for a minimum of 30 months. Again, those longer times on the lees add even more structure and texture to the wine.


As you move through each level of aging from Cava to Reserva to Gran Reserva, the flavors in the foods you match can get increasingly complex and bold.


In My Glass

When I picked up this bottle - Juvé & Camps Reserva de la Familia Gran Reserva Brut from Penedès - at my local Total Wine, I didn't really expect such a fun pour. First, it's a numbered bottle from 2017. Second, it's a blend of three mostly new-to-me grapes: 55% Xarel-lo, 35% Macabeo, and 10% Parellada. Third, 'Brut Nature' indicates that the wine has no added sugar, so it's the Cava in its most natural state. ' Fourth, I love that this family has been making wine for over two hundred years. They were certified organic in 2015.


This Cava was made from free-run juice from three different estates - Espiells (Can Rius), La Cuscona and Mediona - and aged on the lees for 36 months. In the glass, it poured a pale straw color with a surprisingly complex nose with layers of brioche and spices. On the palate the wine was fresh with a finish that makes you think of ripe peach juices running down your chin. It's the quintessential bottle of Summer bubbles.


On My Plate


Eggs are on our dinner table often. We will often make an evening meal such as Italian Uova in Purgatorio, French omelettes, or Mexican Chilaquiles. So, when I came across Huevos Rotos, or 'broken eggs,' as one of the more popular dishes in taverns all across Spain, I had to make a version.


Called 'broken' because the yolks of the sunny side up eggs run freely over the potatoes and meat. This is such a simple, filling dish. And it went beautifully with the Cava. Traditionally the potatoes are fried; I roasted mine to make a slightly healthier version.


Ingredients

  • 6 medium potatoes

  • 1/2 large onion, chopped

  • olive oil

  • 1/3 cup diced Spanish chorizo

  • 3 to 4 large eggs, depending on how hungry you are


Procedure

Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. Cut the potatoes into thick wedges, approximately 6 to 8 wedges per potato. Place the wedges in a large mixing bowl. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to coat. Turn the potatoes out onto the baking sheet in a single layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes until crisped on one side. Turn the potatoes over and return them to the oven for an additional 5 minutes.


Heat a few tablespoons of the olive oil in heavy bottom frying pan over medium heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally. When the onions are soft and transparent, approximately 7 to 8 minutes. Add in the chorizo and cooked till warmed through.


Spoon potatoes onto a serving platter. Top with the onions and chorizo. In the same pan, in which you cooked the onions and chorizo, fry the eggs sunny side up in another splash of olive oil. Place eggs on top of the potatoes. Serve hot. Break up the eggs right before serving.


I also served the pairing with potato crisps, chorizo rosettes, jamón with cantaloupe, and manchego cheese with quince paste.


That's a wrap for my Cava offering in the July #WinePW event. The group will be back next month with unexpected pairings with white wine. Stay tuned!

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